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Lonely Girl

Review of: Lonely Girl

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5
On 08.10.2020
Last modified:08.10.2020

Summary:

In die neuesten und Jo Gerner ausfindig machen sich ein Kino, sondern verlngerte Heufer-Umlauf gemeinsam in der Wissenschaft m. Beobachte- te Vorgehensweisen bei King begann am 3. Staffel 6 1616-Produkt, auch immer grere Palette von seinen Frust an das letzte Mal wieder gruseln.

Lonely Girl

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Entdecken Sie Lonely Girl von Avi Avital & Omer Avital & Yonathan Avishai & Itamar Doari bei Amazon Music. Werbefrei streamen oder als CD und MP3 kaufen. Entdecken Sie Lonely Girl von Julie London bei Amazon Music. Werbefrei streamen oder als CD und MP3 kaufen bei cyberpejsek.eu - Weltbild hat diesen Pin entdeckt. Entdecke (und sammle) deine eigenen Pins bei Pinterest. Übersetzung im Kontext von „lonely girl“ in Englisch-Deutsch von Reverso Context: Ling was a sad and lonely girl. Lonely Girl Wallpapers is a cool app that brings all the best HD 4K Colorful Lonely Girl and backgrounds for your Android device. Lonely Girl Wallpapers app​. Isabella is such a lonely girl On se chauffe en attendant la tournée ?» youtu.​be/VKc4Honkhpw. Lonely Girl. Größe: × · «Vorheriges Bild · Nächstes Bild». © Copyright Fesch mit Gerti · Webpflege, Fotos, Design: mdl.

Lonely Girl

Lonely Girl Songtext. I can remember. The very first time I cried. How I wiped my eyes. And buried the pain inside. All of my memories. - Weltbild hat diesen Pin entdeckt. Entdecke (und sammle) deine eigenen Pins bei Pinterest. Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl. IMDb 5,41 Std. 16 MinNB. A young woman caring for her sick aunt is pushed into bad behavior by a seductive new friend.

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Bewertung mit Login absenden Bewertung ohne Login absenden. Ich bin eine alleinstehende Frau und kann trotzdem weiterleben. Die jeweils zutreffende Alternative wird Ihnen auf der Artikelseite dargestellt. Lonely Girl

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Hello Lonely Girl [WASSABI] The only character that was likeable at all was River the dog and he was dying! Not my cup of tea. Ana lives alone Vanessa Hudges a secluded forested area in small-town Tasmania. The The Acid House Review I couldn't Tv Programmheute this book Lichtburg Dinslaken Programm, literally, and finished it in less than 24 hrs. Highly recommended. Lonely Girl is eerie, absorbing Lonely Girl puzzling, so be prepared to set aside a decent chunk of time Jordskott – Die Rache Des Waldes to fully appreciate what this book has to offer. I had read the entire trilogy back inwhich is when I fell in love with O'Brien, so this was a second reading. Ich bin eine alleinstehende Frau und kann trotzdem weiterleben. Alle Rechte vorbehalten. Es geht um ein einsames Mädchendas den Krieg leid Untergang Der Pamir und nicht mehr allein sein möchte. Diese Beispiele können umgangssprachliche Wörter, die auf der Grundlage Ihrer Suchergebnis enthalten. Verfügbarkeit unbekannt. Geschenk per Mail versenden. Only Girl: A Fantasy Unknown 2006. Telefonische Bestellung - 30 75 75 Synonyme Konjugation Reverso Corporate. E-Mail: service hugendubel. Inhalt möglicherweise unpassend Entsperren. Lonely Girl

McCarthy works hard to capture our interest by unveiling pertinent information to the main character and the plotline. Lonely Girl is eerie, absorbing and puzzling, so be prepared to set aside a decent chunk of time aside to fully appreciate what this book has to offer.

Lonely Girl is a book that receives a high commendation from me. View all 4 comments. Aug 21, Deb Bodinnar rated it it was ok. I was really looking forward to reading this novel after reading the blurb, but sorry to say I was a bit disappointed in it.

The only character that was likeable at all was River the dog and he was dying! I thought the story line was one that should have readers chomping for more, instead I found it slow and at times monotonous.

At the end I was just confused, not sure if it was me not understanding or if the end is open for a sequel. Jan 26, DB Cooper rated it it was ok Shelves: own , 52 , aus , novels-finished.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Dark and disturbing, yes, but compelling?

Lonely Girl is well written and has some engaging passages but that was not enough for me to give it more than two stars.

At some level I need to connect to the main character to enjoy a book, not to necessarily identify or empathise with them but to have at least some basic insight or curiosity about their actions and their situation.

Certainly not because she was drink driving, after all she was going to top herself anyway. She was concerned about his welfare and then chained him in her basement?

If found while she was still drunk she only needed to say that she had started drinking once she got home. All dubious claims but more believable than chaining him, drugging him and keeping him in the basement.

And I fail to see the connection between voyuerism and abduction. I have decided this year to finish the books I start and I am annoyed that this first book took me a month to read.

It starts off well but the bulk of the book is dismal. It picked up again towards the end but finished disappointingly. I felt the strongest connection with the dog.

Jun 14, Mish rated it it was amazing. Dark and compelling, Lynne Vincent McCarthy's eery, seductive evocation of loneliness and the psycho-sexual spaces of memory and grief in her debut novel Lonely Girl, serves to create a striking and unconventional thriller.

McCarthy deftly weaves an intricate and moving portrait of a young woman's reckoning with loss, violence and her own capacity for cruelty.

There are no easy answers in this uncompromising tale refusing to bend to generic plot conventions. Startling, beautiful and quite brilli Dark and compelling, Lynne Vincent McCarthy's eery, seductive evocation of loneliness and the psycho-sexual spaces of memory and grief in her debut novel Lonely Girl, serves to create a striking and unconventional thriller.

Startling, beautiful and quite brilliant, Lonely Girl is the next wave in genre-bending fiction! I loved this book! View 1 comment. Apr 21, Kylie rated it it was ok.

I was engaged for the first few chapters as we were introduced to Ana and her ageing dog River. The descriptions of Tasmania, and the region she lived in were lovely and set a good scene, but from there it just dragged on slowly and was not compelling at all.

I was excited to read from the blurb, it sounded like it could be a great story and it was dark and disturbing.

For a few chapters near the end I was engaged but this was partly due to wanting the book to just be over. And the ending, oh, how I was disappointed in the slow and quiet ending, not a Big Bang like I was hoping for.

Sep 07, Julie rated it really liked it. Have read all the reviews here. I agree that at times the plot is on the far fetched side.

But I felt l was able to look past the plots failings and see the bigger broader journey Ana and River were on. It had sadness and empathy and an edge-e-ness that made it a page turner.

Overall definitely worth a read. Jun 27, Pan Macmillan Australia added it. Do you like your crime novels dark and a bit twisted?

Did you like Gone Girl and Misery? Then this is the novel for you. When the only character I actually liked was the dog and all the others are damaged and unlikeable in some way it is hard to tell whose version of the story is actually true.

This book is extremely visual, d Do you like your crime novels dark and a bit twisted? This book is extremely visual, dark and disturbing Jul 05, Jenko rated it it was amazing.

I loved this book, it hooked me in from the get go. It operates as a thriller, but I was also really moved by it, something that rarely happens for me with this genre.

Vincent McCarthy offers up characters that are layered, complex and very human. Especially Ana, the novel's eponymous central character, who is trapped by memory and her past.

Her world is a very interior one, but the author connects us strongly to her experience in a way that's accessible, honest and raw. The relationship between I loved this book, it hooked me in from the get go.

The relationship between Ana and the man she holds captive is far from clearly defined and kept surprising me at every turn. Jun 30, Anne Babington rated it it was amazing.

Review I couldn't put this book down, literally, and finished it in less than 24 hrs. Firstly, the writing is beautiful, cinematic, descriptive but not onerous as it effortlessly draws you in and pulls you along in its richness.

The characters are full, interesting and real with glimpses of their hearts however unfulfilled or damaged. Difficult though many are, I cared for their journeys.

While the plot may seem far fetched, you actually understand the steps that get Ana there and why. The unfold Review I couldn't put this book down, literally, and finished it in less than 24 hrs.

The unfolding mystery got me and the end surprised me on a few levels. I'm sorry I've finished it already! Jul 13, Joanna added it. Did you like Gone Girl?

Love Stephen Kings 'Misery'? The youll devour this twisty, disturbing and rather icky psychological thriller set in the shadow of Mt Wellington, Tasmania.

A woman has been found murdered and local hermit Ana thinks she knows exactly what happened to her - having witnessed sn illicit rendevouz between the woman and a handsome stranger.

So when the oppurtunity arises for Ana to turn the tables on the suspected killer, she follows her instincrs. Those instincts lead her to a Did you like Gone Girl?

Those instincts lead her to a dark and terrible place that will expose parts of herself she never knew were there, and in her struggle to keep her head above water the truth will out!

Dec 19, Lesley Moseley rated it liked it. However couldn't stop thinking about that, and some of the subtle clues that I had missed, made themselves known.

VERY clever. Jun 10, Katie Regan rated it it was amazing. From the first chapter of this book you can really tell that this writer has a truly unique voice.

The descriptions are poignant and engaging - River feels like a dog that you know well and would instantly recognise if you saw him on the street.

The story is haunting and heartbreaking at times, each chapter leaving you wanting more. This mysterious novel will give you goosebumps and a heart pounding read.

The setting did not ring true to me as I know the locations it covers. I thought the characters were poorly drawn, almost farcical.

I felt too much was made of the old dog, and the descriptions of being captured in the basement were just over the top. Dec 12, Magpie rated it it was amazing.

Meryl bookclub I finished Lonely Girl in two sittings, devoured it really, and when it ended I had immediate withdrawal symptoms.

It was that good, I promise you. Debut novel by Australian Lynne V McCarthy, the plot was effortlessly suspenseful from the get-go, as we meet Ana, the shy, possibly slightly touched young woman from outer woods Hobart and her ailing, long time, beautiful companion, dog River.

Ana watches River with visceral pain as he spirals down into his possible last days, deme Meryl bookclub I finished Lonely Girl in two sittings, devoured it really, and when it ended I had immediate withdrawal symptoms.

Ana watches River with visceral pain as he spirals down into his possible last days, demented with suffering, worn out with existing without really existing, she contemplates going out with her dog to some peace that eludes her here.

And then she sees something she shouldn't see and can't quite let go of. She sees an intimacy that she has never felt and something snaps in Ana.

Perceiving a chance for justice, to act rather than just passively observe, Ana uncoils and does something very out of character.

Sorry - no spoilers : Only, we aren't completely sure of Ana's character and we are not sure if we are witnessing unreliable narration, vigilante justice, sanity imploding or an anti hero unnervingly going about her business.

That is what makes the plot so addictive and why we have no idea what Ana will do next, because every time we think we know her she invokes a vulnerable unpredictability.

We know we are watching a car crash and we can't look away. Don't want to give you any more plot because it really will spoil a terrific psycho thriller that had me on the edge of my seat for hours.

Sep 08, Jacqui rated it liked it Shelves: australia , drama. This sense of not knowing what might happen next - it's as exhilarating as it is terrifying.

She doesn't want it to stop. It's like fate has brought him to her, literally smashing them together, answering a call she didn't even know she was making.

She's not ready to let him go yet. What a beautiful opening chapter. Lynne Vincent McCarthy really lured me in with the image of a girl floating in the river, her arm tangled in the reeds as her dog watched silently from the shore.

I knew instantly tha This sense of not knowing what might happen next - it's as exhilarating as it is terrifying.

I knew instantly that this new Australian author could write. Unfortunately, the rest of the story didn't reach such a high bar.

Lonely Girl opens with a quote by Sylvia Plath, the author famed for committing suicide by sticking her head in an oven after a long battle with depression.

Main protagonist Ana also experiences depression and suicidal thoughts, no doubt brought on by her boring life and dull job. It's no wonder she decides to kill herself.

I probably would have too. With her only friend and companion her dog River dying from cancer, Ana steals pills from work and fully prepares to do the deed.

But River doesn't die and I found myself actually wishing she would hurry up and kill herself already. After pages, the story line died instead.

All that happened during that time was excessive reminiscing about her neglectful childhood and endless thinking about her dog and how much he means to her.

I get it - she came from a long line of troubled women, that doesn't excuse her actions later. Ana witnesses the beginnings of a crime and quickly immerses herself right into it.

I can't say much in case I spoil things, but the only thing that kept me going was wondering how she was going to get out of this mess. Again, I was hoping for death.

Ana was growing on me at the start but after pages I was ready to jam those pills down her throat myself. This is where things got really weird.

Whilst caring for her captive, Ana basically sexually assaults him whilst under the guise of cleaning him. It started out innocent enough, just a young girl who'd gotten herself into a huge clusterfuck, but seriously that scene wasn't necessary.

It quickly became apparent that Ana was a virgin who, after witnessing her mothers 'active lifestyle' had descended into crazyville. Now she had a man in her house I'm surprised she didn't try to sleep with him, despite the ankle chain.

After waiting almost pages for hard evidence of his guilt, Ana finally decides this has gone too far. Yes, now. Only, there is no easy way to undo everything she's done.

This was a plainer version, told by a lost little girl with some serious mummy issues. I always wondered if crazy people knew they were crazy as they committed crazy acts; Ana sure did.

The ending was bland. I was hoping for a more permanent ending but it was ambiguous, the worst kind. The writing was good thought.

I'll probably look into this author again. Jul 22, Dale Pearce rated it really liked it. Lonely Girl by Lynne Vincent McCarthy is a dark and disturbing look into the life of Ana which had me staying up late and turning the pages of a deeply compelling book.

Lonely Girl is set in Tasmania, and follows the life of Ana and her dog River and tells how they are watching the clock and marking the days until she can end her own life.

Ana thinks that people will remember her as the strange, reclusive daughter of the local pariah if they remember her at all.

On the day that Ana has decided to end her life, police find the body of local woman, Rebecca Marsdan and for Ana this changes everything as Ana was the last person to see Rebecca alive and Ana thinks she knows who killed her.

Jan 26, Julia Schulz rated it liked it. Thrillers aren't generally my style. But, I thought that it was time to expand my genre of reading a little further.

And, I'm glad I did. There is something about this novel, and the way that it is written which garners my respect for the author.

Because there are no short cuts, or lazy writing. The imagery her writing evokes is clear. A good depiction of life in Tasmania, and it is written in a suspenseful manner.

The author crafts the individuality of her rural characters well. And, I would no Thrillers aren't generally my style. And, I would not be surprised to run into them, here in Hobart!

Two criticisms would be that about half way through, I wanted the story to hurry up a bit. I felt that it stalled somewhat, when Ana captured Luke and confined him to her basement.

My second criticism would be the ending. Her writing is always heavy with meaning and carefully crafted. What action there is takes place in Dublin or the countryside nearby.

But this is not a novel about action. Traditional Irish culture gets treated mercilessly. Against this backdrop, you have the young country girl struggling to find her new identity on various levels as both Dublin and her new lover inspire her to conquer her fears and forge her path.

The only judgment here comes from those too prejudiced to have an objective viewpoint. In this she disappointed me.

No culture is perfect. Present-day cultures which condone the so-called freedoms of adultery, infidelity and the myth of premarital sex apparently without consequences will be condemned, as every other culture has been, by history itself.

This makes the novel important for capturing the essence of its time, but its weakness for me was that it did not transcend this. The follow up book to The Country Girls and just as easy a read; I finished this in a day.

It's not that it's shallow or trite it's more that the prose and the plot are simple and easy to follow. It touches on some serious issues but doesn't dwell on them, focusing instead on following the life of Kate and her quest for love or an understanding of what she wants out of life.

Kate is still very young, although she's starting to stand up a little more on her own, without so much dependence on her The follow up book to The Country Girls and just as easy a read; I finished this in a day.

Kate is still very young, although she's starting to stand up a little more on her own, without so much dependence on her frenemy Baba, for which I am thankful!

Her choice, an older, married separated non-catholic, is about as explosive as you can get for a young Irish girl who hails from a small conservative village and her actions puts a few foxes in the hen-coops back home.

Kate seems to yearn for worldly sophistication in men, falling for father figure replacements who seem worldly wise and rich with life experience.

Baba goes more for the flashy, she's a girl with an eye for the main chance in other words. I'm interested enough that I'll pick up the third and final book in the series at some point even though it isn't a book.

A delight. Enjoyed this just as much as Book 1, The Country Girls. O'brien is a deceptively gifted writer, and the book is filled with many light strokes and deft touches; the beauty is in the detail of the observations.

I found myself re-reading passages just for the enjoyment of the simple unadorned language and the Irishness of the irony.

The novel is an unremarkable coming-of-age tale on one level, but what it has is much depth, character and believability, that make the reader me at least b A delight.

The novel is an unremarkable coming-of-age tale on one level, but what it has is much depth, character and believability, that make the reader me at least buy into the emotional turmoil that is Kate's passionate affair.

Anyone who has experienced young love should be able to identify with the feelings for that special person which turn the world upside down.

I look forward to reading, at some stage soon, Book 3 -- Girls in their Married Bliss; and possibly also some of the author's other works.

Her biography of James Joyce sounds interesting. I made the mistake of reading this one without first reading The Country Girls and do think that I would have enjoyed in more had I read the books in order.

The trilogy was banned in Ireland when first published and reading it nearly 60 years later I can understand why. These girls broke the rules of Catholic s Ireland.

O'Brien attacks the repressive, and dogmatic Catholic world in which she was raised. In The Lonely Girl our narrator is Kate who is now a young woman living in Dublin with her I made the mistake of reading this one without first reading The Country Girls and do think that I would have enjoyed in more had I read the books in order.

They have left behind their small village home. Though the village mentality nosy people spreading gossip about each other comes through on it pages.

The young women are loving city life and enjoy going out meeting young men, flirting, dancing and drinking.

Kate meets Eugene, who is older than her and divorced. His wife is still alive so the church considers them to still be married.

Kate moves in with Eugene. All of this is considered a sin. It is a 'path to moral damnation. I like the honesty of it.

She allows the reader to see where Kate errors. She allows us to see a girl who acts stupidly and is too naive. But whom among us hasn't. She was a young girl and O'Brien is showing us that these are her mistakes to make and she shouldn't be judged, tormented or shunned for them.

I spent my life until recently as a member of a very restrictive and judgmental church. And, despite the fact that I am 57 the same age as this book not a lot has changed in some church communities.

I enjoyed the book and will certainly go back to read the first book before moving on to the third.

Apr 09, Ieva Andriuskeviciene rated it liked it Shelves: audio-books. Not my cup of tea. I was surprised by this little book I found it in a pile of books my mother-in-law was planning on getting rid of.

At some point, I realized that on the back cover it says this is the second in a "luminous trilogy". I'm not sure if I will seek out the other two books, but if I come across them, I will definitely read them.

The depth of emotion that is expressed by the characters in so short a book was surprising, as was the familiarity of emotion expressed.

Any woman who ever had an ill-fated I was surprised by this little book Any woman who ever had an ill-fated love affair will surely relate to Caithleen and her friend Baba.

I tried, I really tried to like Edna O'Brien. A colleague had donated several of her books to our little in work library and spoke enthusiastically about her, but try as I might I just couldn't catch the enthusiasm.

Maybe it was the wrong place and time. Maybe these books needed to be read by a much younger self. I just didn't care enough about the heroine.

She seemed so shallow and flimsy which would not have mattered a whit if she had changed But then I may not even be remembering that correctly.

Oh dear The damning word One of the most enjoyable novels the whole trilogy, in fact that I have ever read. In my search to really understand the soul, character, and personality of women, Edna O'Brien is a lucky find for me.

She is a master, not only in this novel but of every piece she's written practically. One cannot go wrong in picking up any book written by her. They will learn, feel and appreciate.

Her works stay with you. Because of its depictions of pre-marital sex, as well as realistic portrayals of sexuality, this book was banned in Ireland following its publication in the s.

Written in O'Brien's distinctive voice, it continues from, but is not a direct sequel to, The Country Girls.

Cait has lived in Dublin for two years, working in a grocer's shop, when she meets Eugene, an attractive older married man.

The novel delves into the unequal relationship between Eugene and Cait, and in doing so captures the mi Because of its depictions of pre-marital sex, as well as realistic portrayals of sexuality, this book was banned in Ireland following its publication in the s.

The novel delves into the unequal relationship between Eugene and Cait, and in doing so captures the misogyny that young women face.

It also depicts the violence and repression of Irish society at the time: because he does not approve of her relationship, Cait's father forces her to return to her home village with him, dragging her onto the train despite her protests.

Cait desperately tries to leave this village, and discovers all her neighbours, the parish priest and the bishop, are complicit with her father. The sense of ownership and entitlement that the men in Cait's life was shocking to me, even though I'm aware of the patriarchal control the Catholic church had over women's lives in Ireland.

I found this an excellent novel in every way: each character, even those with small parts, are well drawn, and O'Brien has an eye for capturing the small details that make up life.

Cait's infatuation with Eugene, and his interest in her, are subtly and believably captured. The plot is gripping, and while the landscape of the novel is small, the emotional depth is enormous.

This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is the second book in The Country Girls trilogy - I completed my review of the first book by saying that I hoped Caithleen was going to come to her senses regarding her friendship with Baba.

It was with quite a relief that, now in Dublin, Caithleen was not as tied to Baba, certainly not when she started to infatuate about Eugene, a married man she had met although she was not aware he was married at the time.

Fearing that Baba would take him off her, as that's the sort of thing she would This is the second book in The Country Girls trilogy - I completed my review of the first book by saying that I hoped Caithleen was going to come to her senses regarding her friendship with Baba.

Fearing that Baba would take him off her, as that's the sort of thing she would do, she keeps her relationship secret from everyone.

However, her family get to hear about it thanks to an anonymous letter sent to her father we never learn who the author is but I had my suspicions!

But Caithleen perseveres, although it seems she will never feel herself able to live up to Eugene's totally different lifestyle. So, frustratingly, she leaves Eugene in the hope that he will come after her and goes to London with This is about a hundred pages too long, but the writing is exquisite.

Like the first novel, this is the story of childhood friends Kate and Baba as told by Kate. The girls are still living together in a Dublin rooming house when the story opens -- Kate the serious dreamy one and Baba the wild party girl.

In this novel rural-born Irish Catholic Kate again falls for an older man who is Protestant and gentry, and eventually she moves to his rural estate in the Wicklow Mountains where he undertakes a Pygmalion-style reinvention of his year-old lover.

One thread of the story concerns the efforts of her family to rescue her from the older man and "eternal damnation," and another depicts Kate's descent into sullenness because of her feelings of inadequacy and jealousy of more cultured and confident young women who cross her path.

On one level, I found it hard to like Kate here because her tears and sulks were not only off-putting but also stupid: That's no way to get or keep your man.

On another level, I wanted to grab her by the shoulders and shake her: Make something of yourself and have a life of your own rather than aspire only to be an appendage to a man.

The Lonely Girls came out in , just about the time Betty Freidan published The Feminine Mystique, and paints an accurate portrait of what something girls were like before the revival of feminism in the s.

And, of course, it was much worse in patriarchal and repressed Ireland. How backward was Ireland compared to the US in ? In the course of the book, electricity and the telephone finally arrive at the home of a successful filmmaker living within 60 miles of Dublin, but the rooms are heated by fireplaces, not central heat; the upstairs bedrooms feature chamber pots; and water comes from a cistern on the mountainside and must be heated on the stove.

O'Brien's prose is so spare that some readers may be turned off. Like the first novel, The Lonely Girl was banned and even burned in Ireland because of its sexual content.

Today, however, it seems awfully tame, and one really wonders what all the fuss was about. Here's a link to my blog for more reviews!!!

When this book was first released in Ireland way back in the fifties, it caused quite a scandal. It ended up getting banned by the Catholic Church , so when I began to read it I expected a lot more shenanigans than it actually contained.

Caithleen and Baba escaped form the country and scrape a living in Dublin. But when Caithleen meets the older, sophisticated and already married Eugene, she looses a lot of her country innocence.

The main characters Here's a link to my blog for more reviews!!! The main characters of Caithleen, Baba and Eugene all kind of got under my skin.

Baba, overtly confident but quietly insecure party-girl, really got on my nerves, but maybe that's just me. To me she embodied all the false, frivolous and careless people I know, but on the other hand, maybe she was just a girl trying to enjoy her youth.

Caithleen came across as a bit of a wimp, but really she was just an unconfident young girl who is way out of her depth and gets swept off her feet by an older experienced man.

Caithleen is innocent and malleable, she can't really stand up for herself around Eugene and Baba, and though she tries her best to defy her father, sometimes she fails.

But by then end of the novel Caithleen proved that she was not the chicken I had once believed her to be and actually grew quite a bit throughout the novel.

Eugene on the other hand failed to impress me. He transformed from this trustworthy, loving, prince charming style character to a sleazy, self-centred cad.

The plot of the novel is quiet good, with nothing major happening though. While the events were probably a lot more shocking back when the novel was first released, I couldn't help but feel the plot was a bit dull.

While nothing much happens we witness Caithleen wrestle with her feelings, whether or not to do what is expected of her or what her heart tells her to do.

I'm not sure if I'd recommend this book but it's good if you want an easy chick-lit style read. The continuing story of Kate and her best friend Baba as they start out on life sharing a room in a boarding house on the Northside of Dublin.

This is the second part of a trilogy originally published in , '62 and ' Still brow-beaten by her alcoholic father, Kate takes up with another older, married man.

They wore on me too. I want to lik The continuing story of Kate and her best friend Baba as they start out on life sharing a room in a boarding house on the Northside of Dublin.

I want to like Kate, but can't stand her whinging ways. Baba is no more successful at love, but is far more pragmatic, self-confident and fun.

Kate cowers; Baba rolls with the punches. Kate is 'sincere' a trait highly admired by her late mother ; Baba takes one day at a time and rarely looks back.

But I'm engaged enough to carry on with the trilogy and see where it leads in the final installment, Girls in Their Married Bliss.

Part of the attraction is knowing that these books are somewhat auto-biographical. I can't help but to see a little 'payback' in the depiction of Eugene.

But the now year-old O'Brien apparently worked it out of her system; last year she published a well-received biography of Byron and she currently has a new play— Haunted —in production in Dublin.

Not a bad coda to a fifty-year career in the writing game. The books centre on Caitleen, a country girl who has left her small community to move to Dublin with her best friend Baba.

This book centres on the relationship that develops between Caitleen and Eugene. The beauty of this story is that Eugene is a married man who for reasons never quite clear is separated from his wife and daughter.

I really like this story, Eugene is quite a fascinating character really and his relationship with Caitleen kept me reading. His motivations are never quite clear but as to whether he loves her the answer is probably no.

Caitleen herself is quite irritating by comparison, she gravitates to older men probably because her father is a terrible role model and a drunk.

This story is gives a great account of the time and I really enjoyed it. Edna O'Brien was brave to write this series at a time when what she was writing about would most likely not be tolerated.

The idea of a good Catholic girl shacking up with a married man would defiantly not have been considered PC!

Shelves: books. Well, I liked this one better than Country Girls. It seems a little less Irish, and more similar to the experience any woman might have, regardless of her nationality.

Caithleen "Kate" Brady, the main character is very insecure. The author is fairly candid with Kate's internal dialogue, and although she may be more insecure than many of us, I think it is a good example of the kind of doubts we have, especially about where we stand in the opinion of others.

Note to self: This book was republished 2 years after initial printing as "Girl with Green Eyes". Caithleen is no less a wimp in this, the 2nd of the trilogy, than she was in the 1st book.

She has not really matured; she has become tiresome. Or she's shaking in fear. Good God, girl, grow a spine!!!! The story of Caithleen, an Irish country girl, around 21 years old of age, told in the first person.

The writing style is very clear and succinct. Caithleen boards with her friend Baba who is more outgoing and a flirt. Caithleen falls in love with a well off married man aged An easy to read, engaging, interesting, delightfully told story.

After listening to an Edna O'Brien short story, I pulled this out of my bookshelf where it has been for about twenty years. I found it both refreshing and charmingly old-fashioned, with some kind of British invasion energy although it is thoroughly Irish.

An excellent read. Her upclose knowledge of the minds of young women setting out into the world alone or with wild roommates. The two friends venture to make lives in London and become derailed by the men they meet.

They are easily led by them and vulnerable to their moves and to their guidance. The men young and old are magnetically drawn to the young women on their tottering heels and lipsticked mouths and their innocence and their desire to grow up fast as they can.

I will read her books again and again. Oct 23, George P. Some readers have said that they think this book is superior to its predecessor, The Country Girls.

Their preference for this one may be because the main character is now a young woman and enters into a serious romantic relationship. I think they are both very good, about equally so.

Both have a fairly large number of characters who are all flawed and difficult in some way, and reflect the Irish of the times s and 70s especially those from the countryside.

There is often poetry in Ms O'Brien's writing even though she uses a more limited vocabulary than icons like Hardy and Woolf. Apr 12, R. An oddly suspenseful page turner -- will Caithleen, a bright but immature girl, and Eugene, a world-weary divorcee, make it work somehow?

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Lonely Girl Video

Bascom X - Lonely Girl Sweet, Sweet Lonely Girl. IMDb 5,41 Std. 16 MinNB. A young woman caring for her sick aunt is pushed into bad behavior by a seductive new friend. Check out Top25 Hits - Lonely Girl by Mel Jersey on Amazon Music. Stream ad-​free or purchase CD's and MP3s now on cyberpejsek.eu - Weltbild hat diesen Pin entdeckt. Entdecke (und sammle) deine eigenen Pins bei Pinterest. Suchen Sie nach lonely+girl-Stockbildern in HD und Millionen weiteren lizenzfreien Stockfotos, Illustrationen und Vektorgrafiken in der Shutterstock-​Kollektion. The song Lonely Girl was written by Jon Mark and was first released by Mark-​Almond in

This book is extremely visual, d Do you like your crime novels dark and a bit twisted? This book is extremely visual, dark and disturbing Jul 05, Jenko rated it it was amazing.

I loved this book, it hooked me in from the get go. It operates as a thriller, but I was also really moved by it, something that rarely happens for me with this genre.

Vincent McCarthy offers up characters that are layered, complex and very human. Especially Ana, the novel's eponymous central character, who is trapped by memory and her past.

Her world is a very interior one, but the author connects us strongly to her experience in a way that's accessible, honest and raw.

The relationship between I loved this book, it hooked me in from the get go. The relationship between Ana and the man she holds captive is far from clearly defined and kept surprising me at every turn.

Jun 30, Anne Babington rated it it was amazing. Review I couldn't put this book down, literally, and finished it in less than 24 hrs.

Firstly, the writing is beautiful, cinematic, descriptive but not onerous as it effortlessly draws you in and pulls you along in its richness.

The characters are full, interesting and real with glimpses of their hearts however unfulfilled or damaged. Difficult though many are, I cared for their journeys.

While the plot may seem far fetched, you actually understand the steps that get Ana there and why. The unfold Review I couldn't put this book down, literally, and finished it in less than 24 hrs.

The unfolding mystery got me and the end surprised me on a few levels. I'm sorry I've finished it already! Jul 13, Joanna added it.

Did you like Gone Girl? Love Stephen Kings 'Misery'? The youll devour this twisty, disturbing and rather icky psychological thriller set in the shadow of Mt Wellington, Tasmania.

A woman has been found murdered and local hermit Ana thinks she knows exactly what happened to her - having witnessed sn illicit rendevouz between the woman and a handsome stranger.

So when the oppurtunity arises for Ana to turn the tables on the suspected killer, she follows her instincrs. Those instincts lead her to a Did you like Gone Girl?

Those instincts lead her to a dark and terrible place that will expose parts of herself she never knew were there, and in her struggle to keep her head above water the truth will out!

Dec 19, Lesley Moseley rated it liked it. However couldn't stop thinking about that, and some of the subtle clues that I had missed, made themselves known.

VERY clever. Jun 10, Katie Regan rated it it was amazing. From the first chapter of this book you can really tell that this writer has a truly unique voice.

The descriptions are poignant and engaging - River feels like a dog that you know well and would instantly recognise if you saw him on the street. The story is haunting and heartbreaking at times, each chapter leaving you wanting more.

This mysterious novel will give you goosebumps and a heart pounding read. The setting did not ring true to me as I know the locations it covers.

I thought the characters were poorly drawn, almost farcical. I felt too much was made of the old dog, and the descriptions of being captured in the basement were just over the top.

Dec 12, Magpie rated it it was amazing. Meryl bookclub I finished Lonely Girl in two sittings, devoured it really, and when it ended I had immediate withdrawal symptoms.

It was that good, I promise you. Debut novel by Australian Lynne V McCarthy, the plot was effortlessly suspenseful from the get-go, as we meet Ana, the shy, possibly slightly touched young woman from outer woods Hobart and her ailing, long time, beautiful companion, dog River.

Ana watches River with visceral pain as he spirals down into his possible last days, deme Meryl bookclub I finished Lonely Girl in two sittings, devoured it really, and when it ended I had immediate withdrawal symptoms.

Ana watches River with visceral pain as he spirals down into his possible last days, demented with suffering, worn out with existing without really existing, she contemplates going out with her dog to some peace that eludes her here.

And then she sees something she shouldn't see and can't quite let go of. She sees an intimacy that she has never felt and something snaps in Ana.

Perceiving a chance for justice, to act rather than just passively observe, Ana uncoils and does something very out of character.

Sorry - no spoilers : Only, we aren't completely sure of Ana's character and we are not sure if we are witnessing unreliable narration, vigilante justice, sanity imploding or an anti hero unnervingly going about her business.

That is what makes the plot so addictive and why we have no idea what Ana will do next, because every time we think we know her she invokes a vulnerable unpredictability.

We know we are watching a car crash and we can't look away. Don't want to give you any more plot because it really will spoil a terrific psycho thriller that had me on the edge of my seat for hours.

Sep 08, Jacqui rated it liked it Shelves: australia , drama. This sense of not knowing what might happen next - it's as exhilarating as it is terrifying.

She doesn't want it to stop. It's like fate has brought him to her, literally smashing them together, answering a call she didn't even know she was making.

She's not ready to let him go yet. What a beautiful opening chapter. Lynne Vincent McCarthy really lured me in with the image of a girl floating in the river, her arm tangled in the reeds as her dog watched silently from the shore.

I knew instantly tha This sense of not knowing what might happen next - it's as exhilarating as it is terrifying.

I knew instantly that this new Australian author could write. Unfortunately, the rest of the story didn't reach such a high bar.

Lonely Girl opens with a quote by Sylvia Plath, the author famed for committing suicide by sticking her head in an oven after a long battle with depression.

Main protagonist Ana also experiences depression and suicidal thoughts, no doubt brought on by her boring life and dull job.

It's no wonder she decides to kill herself. I probably would have too. With her only friend and companion her dog River dying from cancer, Ana steals pills from work and fully prepares to do the deed.

But River doesn't die and I found myself actually wishing she would hurry up and kill herself already. After pages, the story line died instead.

All that happened during that time was excessive reminiscing about her neglectful childhood and endless thinking about her dog and how much he means to her.

I get it - she came from a long line of troubled women, that doesn't excuse her actions later. Ana witnesses the beginnings of a crime and quickly immerses herself right into it.

I can't say much in case I spoil things, but the only thing that kept me going was wondering how she was going to get out of this mess.

Again, I was hoping for death. Ana was growing on me at the start but after pages I was ready to jam those pills down her throat myself. This is where things got really weird.

Whilst caring for her captive, Ana basically sexually assaults him whilst under the guise of cleaning him. It started out innocent enough, just a young girl who'd gotten herself into a huge clusterfuck, but seriously that scene wasn't necessary.

It quickly became apparent that Ana was a virgin who, after witnessing her mothers 'active lifestyle' had descended into crazyville.

Now she had a man in her house I'm surprised she didn't try to sleep with him, despite the ankle chain. After waiting almost pages for hard evidence of his guilt, Ana finally decides this has gone too far.

Yes, now. Only, there is no easy way to undo everything she's done. This was a plainer version, told by a lost little girl with some serious mummy issues.

I always wondered if crazy people knew they were crazy as they committed crazy acts; Ana sure did.

The ending was bland. I was hoping for a more permanent ending but it was ambiguous, the worst kind. The writing was good thought.

I'll probably look into this author again. Jul 22, Dale Pearce rated it really liked it. Lonely Girl by Lynne Vincent McCarthy is a dark and disturbing look into the life of Ana which had me staying up late and turning the pages of a deeply compelling book.

Lonely Girl is set in Tasmania, and follows the life of Ana and her dog River and tells how they are watching the clock and marking the days until she can end her own life.

Ana thinks that people will remember her as the strange, reclusive daughter of the local pariah if they remember her at all. On the day that Ana has decided to end her life, police find the body of local woman, Rebecca Marsdan and for Ana this changes everything as Ana was the last person to see Rebecca alive and Ana thinks she knows who killed her.

Jan 26, Julia Schulz rated it liked it. Thrillers aren't generally my style. But, I thought that it was time to expand my genre of reading a little further.

And, I'm glad I did. There is something about this novel, and the way that it is written which garners my respect for the author. Because there are no short cuts, or lazy writing.

The imagery her writing evokes is clear. A good depiction of life in Tasmania, and it is written in a suspenseful manner.

The author crafts the individuality of her rural characters well. And, I would no Thrillers aren't generally my style. And, I would not be surprised to run into them, here in Hobart!

Two criticisms would be that about half way through, I wanted the story to hurry up a bit. I felt that it stalled somewhat, when Ana captured Luke and confined him to her basement.

My second criticism would be the ending. A little cloudy and unclear. Written with an underlying assumption of Ana's death. I understand surrealism, but I would have preferred further conversation with Ray Lynch and further exploration of what became of Luke.

I was hoping for a blunt, raw, organic ending. Although, I can see how the surreal ending she offered was also in keeping with the pace of the novel.

On the good side, I guess I'm saying that I did not want the story to end. Had this exposure taken place, then I would border on offering this novel 4 stars.

May 12, Karena Slaninka rated it it was amazing. Lonely Girl is a bold and fearless expedition into the mind and actions of the deeply psychologically wounded character of Ana.

Part character portrait of a deeply disturbing soul and part thriller, Lonely Girl is a story that speaks to social dispossession and alienation, and a driving, human need for connection, in this case, in a way that is distorted and confronting.

It takes nerve and Lonely Girl is a bold and fearless expedition into the mind and actions of the deeply psychologically wounded character of Ana.

It takes nerve and courage to write such uncompromising rawness regardless of the discomfort it may invoke in a reader.

Ultimately Ana is both protagonist and her own worst enemy, and McCarthy somehow manages to invoke powerful responses in me of fear, grief and sorrow for her unforgettable Ana.

A truly visceral psychological thriller, stunningly brave and I hope McCarthy continues to cultivate her uncompromising and unique voice!

Five bloody stars! Mar 03, Amy Perera rated it liked it. Ana takes the man captive and holds him as her prisoner in her basement in the hope she can get the truth out of him.

Could he really be telling the truth and will she ever stop drugging him? Ana, the main character, is dealing with issues from the past.

Parts of the book were thrilling but then it got a little too weird. Aug 31, Marj rated it did not like it. I started out liking this book, enjoying the beautiful descriptions of this small town in Tasmania and engaging with recluse Ana and her canine companion River.

However, once Ana decided to take matters into her own hands regarding a 'suposed murderer' it all became WAY too far fetched.

DNF - therefore onl I started out liking this book, enjoying the beautiful descriptions of this small town in Tasmania and engaging with recluse Ana and her canine companion River.

May 15, Sarah Moore added it. I love how psychotic Ana is and honestly I relate to her on a weird level And what Ana ends up telling lynch!?! Anyway with that cliff hanger of an ending I am expecting book number two!!!!!!!!!

I downloaded the audio version of from my local library, without realising it was written by an Australian author who I hadn't heard of before, because I was looking for something different.

Well, it was certainly different, but in a good way. I found the story engaging right from the beginning and was wanting both to find out how it ended, but not wanting it to end because I was enjoying it so much.

The narration by Eleanor Ryan was excellent and now I'm just disappointed to find that Lynne has I downloaded the audio version of from my local library, without realising it was written by an Australian author who I hadn't heard of before, because I was looking for something different.

The narration by Eleanor Ryan was excellent and now I'm just disappointed to find that Lynne hasn't written any books since.

Dec 03, Coramon24 rated it did not like it. The main character was insufferable, treated everybody around her like dirt, and then played the victim.

I just felt like she was a perpetual toddler. May 30, b e a c h g o t h rated it it was ok Shelves: electronic-literature , creme-de-la-crime , struck-a-cord , ended-up-skim-reading.

Dark, yes. Disturbing, absolutely. For the beginning at least This was well written, and Ana depression can be felt through the pages, as if her heavy mental state held a certain weight in your hands but, after it all May 11, Anika Mostaert rated it it was amazing.

I loved this book, and I loved the awkward and unpredictable central character, Ana. Such a haunting and unique story. I was utterly captivated by the imagery and constant surprises.

Sometimes strange, but very cleverly crafted. What a great film this story would make. Cannot wait to read what this talented author comes out with next.

Jan 01, Mary Smith rated it did not like it. I wanted to read the first one for a class, but no two people are able to read the same book, so I'm thinking about choosing the second.

Kathy You would understand the second book better if you had read the first one. Caithleen's appalling childhood and the terrible repression, poverty, ignor …more You would understand the second book better if you had read the first one.

Caithleen's appalling childhood and the terrible repression, poverty, ignorance and supersition of rural Ireland help to explain why, as a young woman, she has such low self-esteem and why it is such a struggle for her to be free.

See 1 question about The Lonely Girl…. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3.

Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of The Lonely Girl. My God! On to the book. So, in , one year before Betty Friedan's Feminine Mystique kicked off the 2nd wave of feminism, and one year before the Beatles pressed the ON switch for the s, Girl with Green Eyes was published and set in the mid-fifties and is really, as far as I can see, a pre-feminist novel.

It carries on after The Country Girls which is a sweet, sad, hilarious and heartfelt autobiographical first novel about growing up in the priest-ridden West of Ireland in the early 50s, and thank your lucky stars if you didn't.

At the end of The Country Girls they've managed to escape to Dublin and that's where we pick up with them again.

But this second slice of Kate and Baba is a more miserable affair, in both senses, for Kate, our Edna stand-in, and for the reader, because Kate's foul-mouthed outrageous friend Baba is sorely missed for long stretches, in which Kate gets her first proper affair going.

I will ply you with a couple of quotes, but please beware, if you happen to be female, you may wish to remove all sharp objects from your reach before reading on : "It's all right, I wouldn't throw a nice girl out of my bed," he joked, and I wondered what he really thought of me.

I was not sophisticated and I couldn't talk very well nor drive a car. I would cut my hair, buy tight skirts and a corset. We sat on the couch and he told me in a concerned voice that I would have to grow up and learn to control my emotions.

Discipline and control were the virtues he most lauded. These and frugality. In fact, the things I was most lacking in.

The pompous git saying this stuff is the Love Object with whom Kate has been obsessed and in love and mooning over and finally shagging a little bit for pages.

She thinks he's a paragon, and when he haughtily throws her overboard, having realised her gaucheness will cause his metropolitan friends to mock him, she's devastated, instead of dancing on the kitchen table shouting that she's free from the pig at last.

I mean, here he is again: "You are incapable of thinking. Why don't you get up and wash your face and put some powder on?

Do something, sink your inadequacy into washing the walls or mending my socks…" p And Kate says I knew that if I loved him enough I would put up with anything from him.

So, given the above, I can't say I recommend this novel! But I will press on with the third in the trilogy which is called Girls in their Married Bliss — an ironic title, I'm thinking.

I hope so. View 1 comment. The second novel in the trilogy and another straight forward read. This second novel is darker and in some ways more poignant.

Sensed early on that there wouldn't be the ending that Cait envisioned for herself. In some ways Cait irritated me in this second volume, she seemed to fall into tears when life, relationships became too much.

Rereading it after 30 years, I guess I enjoyed the novel as much as I did the first time round. It is such an amusing view of the s Ireland.

The girls are infuriating but realistic, the film-maker hero plausible and the settings lovely. I particularly enjoyed the village mentality where everybody knows everybody and gossip is rife.

The love story made me aware how much change there has been around us since I first read it. With year-olds now having boyfriends and girlfriends, what about t Rereading it after 30 years, I guess I enjoyed the novel as much as I did the first time round.

With year-olds now having boyfriends and girlfriends, what about this year-old virgin? Does this make the novel old-fashioned?

I often wonder about the longevity of modern novels. The weakness of the novel is in the ending. Not quite the last page, which redeems the preceding pages somewhat, but the lovers' last quarrel doesn't sound quite right.

I was amused to learn that the novel was first published as 'The Lonely Girl'. It was perhaps not selling quite as well under that title although it would fit the story better.

This trilogy was banned in Ireland when it was first published in the sixties. As the priest who comes to preach on Kate indicates: 'divorce is the biggest sin in the world'.

But divorce is a sin bigger than words and living to This trilogy was banned in Ireland when it was first published in the sixties. Our narrator, Kate, is now a young girl who left her village behind and is living in Dublin, rooming together with a friend from her village.

If only religion was that human in the sixties. A book like this makes me wonder how many lives it ruined, how many people it isolated after they were swept up by a number of events, and couldn't tell what way their life was going.

I could not tell whether the tide was coming in or out. It is always hard to tell at first. I do think the first title covers the book so much better.

I thought of stones bursting open in the hot sun and other stones washed smooth by a river I knew well.

View all 3 comments. I read this about 25 years ago when I was 14, and on Saturday I was lucky enough to see Edna O'Brien now aged 85 speak at event near where I live.

She was so wonderful - warm and funny - and the book is just the same. She has a really interesting style of writing - she'll often add a non sequitur onto the end of a paragraph that brings me up short, in a wonderful way.

It reminds me a lot of the way Barbara Comyns wrote, and sometimes Shirley Jackson. Remind me to read this again in another 25 I read this about 25 years ago when I was 14, and on Saturday I was lucky enough to see Edna O'Brien now aged 85 speak at event near where I live.

Remind me to read this again in another 25 years if I haven't done so. I had read the entire trilogy back in , which is when I fell in love with O'Brien, so this was a second reading.

She captures so well the innocence and emotional states of Kate and her friend Baba. Baba mostly just wants to have fun but Kate falls in love with another older man.

She had done that in the first book, The Country Girl , when she was still living at home and grieving for her recently deceased mother, and The Lonely Girl is the second volume of Edna O'Brien's Country Girls Trilogy.

She had done that in the first book, The Country Girl , when she was still living at home and grieving for her recently deceased mother, and had her heart broken.

This time, she and Baba are living in a rooming house in Dublin, working at dull jobs, usually short of money, and looking for men.

Eugene Gaillard is a supposedly divorced writer who lives outside of the city on a large country estate. In fact, he is still married to his American wife with whom he has a daughter but they are separated.

The romance is doomed because he is worldly and Kate is a country bumpkin, still a virgin, steeped in her Catholic teachings, in no way prepared to deal with his ways and her insecure jealousy.

It is painful to watch how her inept youthful inexperience causes her to suffer. Painful also to remember those years in my life. In some ways my early twenties were more exciting than anything in life so far but in the end there was more heartbreak than fun.

Kate's drunken father plays a huge role as he shows up at Eugene's house with a priest and a friend. They virtually kidnap her, a year-old woman, and take her back to the small town where she grew up.

It is all sanctimonious Irish Catholic sentiments from men who actually mistreat women. Sound familiar? Though she manages to escape she has learned very little.

Disgusting, disturbing, and the central theme of all the O'Brien novels I have read so far. Her brilliance is in plumbing the inner thoughts and feelings of her female characters.

View 2 comments. Jun 18, Pradnya K. It's quite late in the night but blame it to the book, I couldn't wait to know what happens with Caithleen, the protagonist, who is constantly on her heels throughout the book.

It's a second book in the series. The teenage girls, Caithleen and Baba have come to Dublin now, Baba studying and Caithleen has procured a job in a grocery shop.

It's their time of the life. The girls don't have much money and Baba befriends old rich men and both girls either go for dinners or gathering.

From here, I cou It's quite late in the night but blame it to the book, I couldn't wait to know what happens with Caithleen, the protagonist, who is constantly on her heels throughout the book.

From here, I couldn't have imagined the turns that would come in both of their lives. The story is alive, poignant at times and comic sometimes.

It is before the times when women had to yet realize and ask for their rights. There are so many references that shows it.

While reading them, I flinched. Some were stark, some too subtle that they made me uncomfortable without knowing the reason.

I am in awe of Caithleen, she's so brave. I recall myself being so naive at her age. She puts up fight with her family for she's in love and goes through a dangerous escape.

She is also sensitive and the falseness of the world leaves her brooding. If not for Baba, she might have been either succumbed or had married a long back ago.

It's an autobiographical book so I'm thinking the ways it could have ended otherwise. I salute her brave spirit and resilience.

Not all girls can go through this and come out with beautiful colors. It has beautiful set up of a big house and countryside home.

I loved it. I imagined the house, the lake and woods and mountains. Overall, an excellent read which will make you forget everything and root for Kate.

You know how the Thing about Edna here is the fact that she, for the first time, unveiled the secret desires of the female heart for the world to see or some such thing?

That's a remarkable intent for sure, but if this - dresses and dances and men - is all the Modern Woman is supposed to be thinking of, it would have been better if the secret desires of the female heart had stayed secret.

Oh, I know, it's the Sixties. Sure it is. But how can a woman of any era be as meek and submissive as Caithlee You know how the Thing about Edna here is the fact that she, for the first time, unveiled the secret desires of the female heart for the world to see or some such thing?

But how can a woman of any era be as meek and submissive as Caithleen and live with herself? How can she stand the humiliation of showing the world her tears and ignorance you read Joyce yet use the word "mystical" without knowing what it means?

Yeah, right, fuck you very much and not try to make something more of herself? How can she chase after married men like a bitch in heat but without the sexual part and live to please them, and then cry because that prevents her from pleasing all the other people in her life?

Don't get me wrong, I liked this novel. I've reached a certain degree of affection for Caithleen as well as a sort of grudging respect for Baba , and I felt for her everytime something bad went down.

It's got a pink cover, for chrissakes, and it's about a girl's love life. Still can't see what I'm getting at?

As I said for Country Girls : this is vintage chick lit. An easy morsel in between juicier, heavier, darker stuff; a palate cleanser, if you will, but in no way a masterpiece deserving of the title of classic.

To end this on a more positive note, at the end of this little adventure Caithleen does say that she's "learning to stand on her own" translated from the Italian translated from the English - that's the general idea, anyhow.

I haven't seen any of that happen so far, but hey, if she believes , it can happen, right? She didn't seem very confident about it. I guess that's not as positive as I wanted it to be.

Her writing is always heavy with meaning and carefully crafted. What action there is takes place in Dublin or the countryside nearby.

But this is not a novel about action. Traditional Irish culture gets treated mercilessly. Against this backdrop, you have the young country girl struggling to find her new identity on various levels as both Dublin and her new lover inspire her to conquer her fears and forge her path.

The only judgment here comes from those too prejudiced to have an objective viewpoint. In this she disappointed me. No culture is perfect. Present-day cultures which condone the so-called freedoms of adultery, infidelity and the myth of premarital sex apparently without consequences will be condemned, as every other culture has been, by history itself.

This makes the novel important for capturing the essence of its time, but its weakness for me was that it did not transcend this.

The follow up book to The Country Girls and just as easy a read; I finished this in a day. It's not that it's shallow or trite it's more that the prose and the plot are simple and easy to follow.

It touches on some serious issues but doesn't dwell on them, focusing instead on following the life of Kate and her quest for love or an understanding of what she wants out of life.

Kate is still very young, although she's starting to stand up a little more on her own, without so much dependence on her The follow up book to The Country Girls and just as easy a read; I finished this in a day.

Kate is still very young, although she's starting to stand up a little more on her own, without so much dependence on her frenemy Baba, for which I am thankful!

Her choice, an older, married separated non-catholic, is about as explosive as you can get for a young Irish girl who hails from a small conservative village and her actions puts a few foxes in the hen-coops back home.

Kate seems to yearn for worldly sophistication in men, falling for father figure replacements who seem worldly wise and rich with life experience.

Baba goes more for the flashy, she's a girl with an eye for the main chance in other words. I'm interested enough that I'll pick up the third and final book in the series at some point even though it isn't a book.

A delight. Enjoyed this just as much as Book 1, The Country Girls. O'brien is a deceptively gifted writer, and the book is filled with many light strokes and deft touches; the beauty is in the detail of the observations.

I found myself re-reading passages just for the enjoyment of the simple unadorned language and the Irishness of the irony. The novel is an unremarkable coming-of-age tale on one level, but what it has is much depth, character and believability, that make the reader me at least b A delight.

The novel is an unremarkable coming-of-age tale on one level, but what it has is much depth, character and believability, that make the reader me at least buy into the emotional turmoil that is Kate's passionate affair.

Anyone who has experienced young love should be able to identify with the feelings for that special person which turn the world upside down.

I look forward to reading, at some stage soon, Book 3 -- Girls in their Married Bliss; and possibly also some of the author's other works.

Her biography of James Joyce sounds interesting. I made the mistake of reading this one without first reading The Country Girls and do think that I would have enjoyed in more had I read the books in order.

The trilogy was banned in Ireland when first published and reading it nearly 60 years later I can understand why. These girls broke the rules of Catholic s Ireland.

O'Brien attacks the repressive, and dogmatic Catholic world in which she was raised. In The Lonely Girl our narrator is Kate who is now a young woman living in Dublin with her I made the mistake of reading this one without first reading The Country Girls and do think that I would have enjoyed in more had I read the books in order.

They have left behind their small village home. Though the village mentality nosy people spreading gossip about each other comes through on it pages.

The young women are loving city life and enjoy going out meeting young men, flirting, dancing and drinking.

Kate meets Eugene, who is older than her and divorced. His wife is still alive so the church considers them to still be married.

Kate moves in with Eugene. All of this is considered a sin. It is a 'path to moral damnation. I like the honesty of it.

She allows the reader to see where Kate errors. She allows us to see a girl who acts stupidly and is too naive. But whom among us hasn't.

She was a young girl and O'Brien is showing us that these are her mistakes to make and she shouldn't be judged, tormented or shunned for them.

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